Latest & greatest articles for pain

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Top results for pain

121. Nonopioid Pharmacologic Treatments for Chronic Pain

Nonopioid Pharmacologic Treatments for Chronic Pain Nonopioid Pharmacologic Treatments for Chronic Pain Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 228 R Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 228 Nonopioid Pharmacologic Treatments for Chronic Pain Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane Rockville, MD 20857 www.ahrq.gov Contract No. 290-2015-00009-I Prepared by: Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center Portland (...) , OR Investigators: Marian S. McDonagh, Pharm.D. Shelley S. Selph, M.D., M.P.H. David I. Buckley, M.D., M.P.H. Rebecca S. Holmes, M.D., M.S. Kimberly Mauer, M.D. Shaun Ramirez, M.P.H. Frances C. Hsu, M.S. Tracy Dana, M.L.S. Rochelle Fu, Ph.D. Roger Chou, M.D. AHRQ Publication No. 20-EHC010 April 2020 ii Key Messages Purpose of Review Evaluate the benefits and harms of nonopioid drugs in randomized controlled trials of patients with specific types of chronic pain, considering the effects on pain, function

2020 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

122. Noninvasive Nonpharmacological Treatment for Chronic Pain

Noninvasive Nonpharmacological Treatment for Chronic Pain Noninvasive Nonpharmacological Treatment for Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review Update Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 227 R Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 227 Noninvasive Nonpharmacological Treatment for Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review Update Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane Rockville, MD 20857 www.ahrq.gov Contract No. 290-2015 (...) for common chronic pain conditions. Key Messages • Interventions that improved function and/or pain for =1 month: o Low back pain: Exercise, psychological therapy, spinal manipulation, low-level laser therapy, massage, mindfulness-based stress reduction, yoga, acupuncture, multidisciplinary rehabilitation (MDR) o Neck pain: Exercise, low-level laser, mind-body practices, massage, acupuncture o Knee osteoarthritis: Exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) o Hip osteoarthritis: Exercise, manual

2020 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

123. Opioid Treatments for Chronic Pain

Opioid Treatments for Chronic Pain Opioid Treatments for Chronic Pain Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 229 R Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 229 Opioid Treatments for Chronic Pain Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane Rockville, MD 20857 www.ahrq.gov Contract No. 290-2015-00009-I Prepared by: Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center Portland, OR Investigators: Roger Chou, M.D. Daniel Hartung (...) , Pharm.D. Judith Turner, Ph.D. Ian Blazina, M.P.H. Brian Chan, M.D. Ximena Levander, M.D. Marian McDonagh, Pharm.D. Shelley Selph, M.D., M.P.H. Rongwei Fu, Ph.D. Miranda Pappas, M.A. AHRQ Publication No. 20-EHC011 April 2020 ii Key Messages Purpose of Review To assess the effectiveness and harms of opioid therapy for chronic noncancer pain, alternative opioid dosing strategies, and risk mitigation strategies Key Messages • Opioids are associated with small improvements versus placebo in pain

2020 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

124. Acute Nonspecific Chest Pain-Low Probability of Coronary Artery Disease

Acute Nonspecific Chest Pain-Low Probability of Coronary Artery Disease American College of Radiology End User License Agreement ACR Appropriateness Criteria is a registered trademark of the American College of Radiology. By accessing the ACR Appropriateness Criteria®, you expressly agree and consent to the terms and conditions as described at: http://www.acr.org/~/media/ACR/Documents/AppCriteria/TermsandConditions.pdf Personal use of material is permitted for research, scientific (...) and/or information purposes only. You may not modify or create derivative works based on American College of Radiology material. No part of any material posted on the American College of Radiology Web site may be copied, downloaded, stored in a retrieval system, or redistributed for any other purpose without the expressed written permission of American College of Radiology. Date of origin: 1998 Last review date: 2015 ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 1 Acute Nonspecific Chest Pain–Low Probability of CAD American

2020 American College of Radiology

125. Chronic Foot Pain

Chronic Foot Pain American College of Radiology End User License Agreement ACR Appropriateness Criteria is a registered trademark of the American College of Radiology. By accessing the ACR Appropriateness Criteria®, you expressly agree and consent to the terms and conditions as described at: http://www.acr.org/~/media/ACR/Documents/AppCriteria/TermsandConditions.pdf Personal use of material is permitted for research, scientific and/or information purposes only. You may not modify or create (...) derivative works based on American College of Radiology material. No part of any material posted on the American College of Radiology Web site may be copied, downloaded, stored in a retrieval system, or redistributed for any other purpose without the expressed written permission of American College of Radiology. Date of origin: 1998 Last review date: 2013 ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 1 ChronicFootPain American College of Radiology ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Clinical Condition: Chronic Foot Pain

2020 American College of Radiology

126. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for acute low back pain. (Abstract)

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for acute low back pain. Acute low back pain (LBP) is a common health problem. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often used in the treatment of LBP, particularly in people with acute LBP. In 2008, a Cochrane Review was published about the efficacy of NSAIDs for LBP (acute, chronic, and sciatica), identifying a small but significant effect in favour of NSAIDs compared to placebo for short-term pain reduction and global improvement (...) ) or alternative treatments for acute LBP in adults (≥ 18 years); conducted in both primary and secondary care settings. We assessed the effects of treatment on pain reduction, disability, global improvement, adverse events, and return to work.Two review authors independently selected trials to be included in this review, evaluated the risk of bias, and extracted the data. If appropriate, we performed a meta-analysis, using a random-effects model throughout, due to expected variability between studies. We

2020 Cochrane

127. Clonidine for pain in non-ventilated infants. (Abstract)

Clonidine for pain in non-ventilated infants. Critically ill newborn infants undergo a variety of painful procedures or experience a variety of painful conditions during their early life in the neonatal unit. In the critically ill paediatric and neonatal population, clonidine is prescribed as an adjunct to opioids or benzodiazepines aiming to reduce the doses of these drugs that are required for analgesia or sedation, or to facilitate weaning from mechanical ventilation. It has been shown (...)  that clonidine premedication might have a positive effect on postoperative pain in children.To assess the benefit and harms of clonidine for the prevention or treatment of procedural pain; postoperative pain; or pain associated with clinical conditions in non-ventilated neonates.We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to search the CENTRAL, MEDLINE via PubMed, Embase, and CINAHL to December 2018. We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists

2020 Cochrane

128. Epidural corticosteroid injections for lumbosacral radicular pain. (Abstract)

Epidural corticosteroid injections for lumbosacral radicular pain. Lumbosacral radicular pain (commonly called sciatica) is a syndrome involving patients who report radiating leg pain. Epidural corticosteroid injections deliver a corticosteroid dose into the epidural space, with the aim of reducing the local inflammatory process and, consequently, relieving the symptoms of lumbosacral radicular pain. This Cochrane Review is an update of a review published in Annals of Internal Medicine in 2012 (...) . Some placebo-controlled trials have been published recently, which highlights the importance of updating the previous review.To investigate the efficacy and safety of epidural corticosteroid injections compared with placebo injection on pain and disability in patients with lumbosacral radicular pain.We searched the following databases without language limitations up to 25 September 2019: Cochrane Back and Neck group trial register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, International

2020 Cochrane

129. Exercise for osteoarthritis pain: how strong is the evidence?

Exercise for osteoarthritis pain: how strong is the evidence? Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 4,800 family physicians, family medicine residents, and medical students in Alberta. Established over sixty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education and primary care research. www.acfp.ca March (...) 16, 2020 Exercise for osteoarthritis pain: how strong is the evidence? Clinical Question: Is exercise effective for pain management in hip/knee osteoarthritis? Bottom Line: In adults with knee or hip osteoarthritis, exercise can lead to ~30% pain improvement for 47% of patients versus 21% with no exercise at 6-104 weeks, benefiting one additional person for every 4 treated. The type of exercise does not significantly affect the results, however most included trials utilized physiotherapy

2020 Tools for Practice

130. Efficacy of laser therapy on pain in elderly patients using laser of 808nm wavelength

Efficacy of laser therapy on pain in elderly patients using laser of 808nm wavelength Efficacy of laser therapy on pain in elderly patients using laser of 808nm wavelength We use cookies on this website. By using this site, you agree that we may store and access cookies on your device. Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services Efficacy of laser therapy on pain in elderly patients using laser of 808nm wavelength Share: Reading time approx. 3 minutes (...) The objectives of the current review were to estimate the effectiveness of treatment with laser to reduce pain in muscles and ligaments in elderly patients. The equipment used should be of 808nm wavelength or preferably the MID-LITE 8080. Question What scientific studies are there on pain and laser treatment with MID-LITE 8080 or other equipment of 808nm wavelength? Identified literature No relevant systematic review was identified and no primary studies. Literature search PubMed via NLM 200122 Laser

2020 Swedish Council on Technology Assessement

131. Radiofrequency denervation for chronic back pain stemming from the facet joints

Radiofrequency denervation for chronic back pain stemming from the facet joints Radiofrequency denervation for chronic back pain stemming from the facet joints We use cookies on this website. By using this site, you agree that we may store and access cookies on your device. Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services Radiofrequency denervation for chronic back pain stemming from the facet joints Share: Reading time approx. 7 minutes Chronic backpain is very (...) common and can often be traced to the facet joints. Facet joints are located between the protruding portions of adjacent vertebrae and serve to guide and stabilise the backbone, especially when extending or twisting. Radiofrequency ablation aims to alleviate back pain by disrupting the transmission of pain signals carried by the spinal nerves associated with the facet joints. Question What systematic reviews have been published that assess the efficacity of radiofrequency denervation in treating

2020 Swedish Council on Technology Assessement

132. FPM response to concern related to the safety of steroids injected as part of pain procedures during the current COVID-19 virus pandemic

FPM response to concern related to the safety of steroids injected as part of pain procedures during the current COVID-19 virus pandemic FPM response to concern related to the safety of steroids injected as part of pain procedures during the current COVID-19 virus pandemic 17 March 2020 Introduction Members have asked questions as to the safety of use of injected steroids for pain procedures during the current COVID-19 virus pandemic. Steroid use is common in pain procedures with the aim (...) of easing pain, increasing mobility and quality of life. Their duration of effect is variable but can provide several months of benefit. The immunological impact of steroids given this way in patients with COVID-19 is unknown. As a result of the long quarantine period of an average of 14 days, there is also a risk that asymptomatic patients who are carrying the virus could be treated, potentially putting them at increased risk of an adverse outcome from the virus. There does appear to be higher risk

2020 Faculty of Pain Medicine

133. Guidance on Competencies for Paediatric Pain Medicine

Guidance on Competencies for Paediatric Pain Medicine Guidance on Competencies for Paediatric Pain Medicine March 2020CONTENTS SECTION PAGE Introduction 3 Guidance 5 A: Core competencies for practitioners in Pain Medicine 5 Appendix A: Curriculum 6 B: Competencies for practitioners in Pain Medicine who are involved in a paediatric pain service or lead transition of adolescents to adult services 7 Appendix B: Curriculum 9 GUIDANCE ON COMPETENCIES FOR PAEDIATRIC PAIN MEDICINE 2INTRODUCTION (...) The management of pain in childhood depends on a thorough understanding of the developmental and environmental factors that influence nociceptive processing, pain perception and the response to treatment during maturation from infancy to adolescence. Nociceptive pathways are functional at birth. Painful stimuli trigger physiological and behavioural responses at all ages. However, developmental changes in the structure, function and modulation of pain pathways impact on the response to injury and analgesia

2020 Faculty of Pain Medicine

134. Opioids, chronic pain and the bigger picture

Opioids, chronic pain and the bigger picture OPIOID TAPERING ALGORITHM 1–9 Patient who is taking opioids No meaningful improvement in pain and/or function Cause of pain has resolved Adverse effects are intolerable Risk of harm outweighs potential benefits Signs of aberrant behaviour • Discuss the decision to taper an opioid with the patient • Ask each patient about their treatment goals and their perceived benefits and harms of opioid treatment • Listen to the patient’s beliefs and concerns (...) and preferences Fast taper Appropriate after a short period of opioid treatment (< 3 months) Reduce daily opioid dose each week by 10%–25% of the starting dose Review the patient frequently, emphasise the benefits of tapering and assess response against set goals Tapering progressing well improved function, controlled pain, reduced side effects Taper to the lowest effective dose, which may mean stopping the opioid • Some patients may not entirely stop using opioids but any dose reduction may be beneficial

2020 National Prescribing Service Limited (Australia)

135. Recommendations on Chronic Pain Practice during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Recommendations on Chronic Pain Practice during the COVID-19 Pandemic Recommendations on Chronic Pain Practice during the COVID-19 Pandemic - American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Search Recommendations on Chronic Pain Practice during the COVID-19 Pandemic A Joint Statement by American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) and European Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Therapy (ESRA) Authors: Harsha Shanthanna, MBBS, MD, MSc, FRCPC; Steven P. Cohen (...) General Considerations in Chronic Pain Patients Susceptibility of chronic pain patients could be higher as many are elderly with multiple comorbidities and potential immune suppression. 4,5 Significant immune changes occur in a patient with COVID-19 disease. 3,6 Chronic pain exerts complex effects on the immune system, including immunosuppression in some individuals. 7 Chronic opioid therapy may cause immune suppression in some patients, and individual opioids differ in their potential. 8,9 Use

2020 American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

136. Pain Management Best Practices from Multispecialty Organizations during the COVID-19 Pandemic and Public Health Crises Full Text available with Trip Pro

Pain Management Best Practices from Multispecialty Organizations during the COVID-19 Pandemic and Public Health Crises Pain Management Best Practices from Multispecialty Organizations during the COVID-19 Pandemic and Public Health Crises | Pain Medicine | Oxford Academic ') We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website.By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search (...) Term search filter search input Article Navigation Close mobile search navigation Article Navigation Article Contents Article Navigation Accepted manuscript Pain Management Best Practices from Multispecialty Organizations during the COVID-19 Pandemic and Public Health Crises Steven P Cohen, MD COL (ret) Professor of Anesthesiology, Neurology and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Chief of Pain Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and Professor of Anesthesiology and Physical Medicine

2020 American Academy of Pain Medicine

137. Comparison of Early-Stage and Late-Stage Periarticular Injection for Pain Relief After Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

Comparison of Early-Stage and Late-Stage Periarticular Injection for Pain Relief After Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial Comparison of Early-Stage and Late-Stage Periarticular Injection for Pain Relief After Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Welcome to the new PubMed. For legacy PubMed go to . Clipboard (...) in email: Save Cancel Create a file for external citation management software Create file Cancel Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation J Arthroplasty Actions . 2019 Dec 17;S0883-5403(19)31169-6. doi: 10.1016/j.arth.2019.12.020. Online ahead of print. Comparison of Early-Stage and Late-Stage Periarticular Injection for Pain Relief After Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hokusuikai

2020 EvidenceUpdates

138. Consensus Practice Guidelines on Interventions for Lumbar Facet Joint Pain

Consensus Practice Guidelines on Interventions for Lumbar Facet Joint Pain 1 Cohen SP , et al. Reg Anesth Pain Med 2020;0:1–44. doi:10.1136/rapm-2019-101243 Special article Consensus practice guidelines on interventions for lumbar facet joint pain from a multispecialty, international working group Steven P Cohen , 1 Arun Bhaskar, 2 Anuj Bhatia, 3 Asokumar Buvanendran, 4 Tim Deer, 5 Shuchita Garg, 6 W Michael Hooten , 7 Robert W Hurley, 8 David J Kennedy, 9 Brian C McLean, 10 Jee Youn Moon, 11 (...) Samer Narouze, 12 Sanjog Pangarkar, 13 David Anthony Provenzano, 14 Richard Rauck, 15 B Todd Sitzman, 16 Matthew Smuck, 17 Jan van Zundert , 18,19 Kevin Vorenkamp, 20 Mark S Wallace, 21 Zirong Zhao 22 To cite: Cohen SP , Bhaskar A, Bhatia A, et al. Reg Anesth Pain Med Epub ahead of print: [please include Day Month Year]. doi:10.1136/rapm-2019- 101243 ? Additional material is published online only. To view, please visit the journal online (http:// dx. doi . org/ 10. 1136/ r apm- 2019- 101243

2020 American Academy of Pain Medicine

139. Randomized Clinical Trial of IV Acetaminophen as an Adjunct to IV Hydromorphone for Acute Severe Pain in Emergency Department Patients

Randomized Clinical Trial of IV Acetaminophen as an Adjunct to IV Hydromorphone for Acute Severe Pain in Emergency Department Patients Randomized Clinical Trial of Intravenous (IV) Acetaminophen as an Adjunct to IV Hydromorphone for Acute Severe Pain in Emergency Department Patients - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Welcome to the new PubMed. For legacy PubMed go to . Clipboard, Search History, and several (...) Create a file for external citation management software Create file Cancel Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Acad Emerg Med Actions . 2020 Feb 20. doi: 10.1111/acem.13947. Online ahead of print. Randomized Clinical Trial of Intravenous (IV) Acetaminophen as an Adjunct to IV Hydromorphone for Acute Severe Pain in Emergency Department Patients , , , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliation 1 From the, Department of Emergency Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY. PMID

2020 EvidenceUpdates

140. A Systematic Literature Review of Brain Neurostimulation Therapies for the Treatment of Pain Full Text available with Trip Pro

A Systematic Literature Review of Brain Neurostimulation Therapies for the Treatment of Pain A Systematic Literature Review of Brain Neurostimulation Therapies for the Treatment of Pain - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Welcome to the new PubMed. For legacy PubMed go to . Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable. National Institutes of Health U.S. National (...) Permalink Copy Page navigation Pain Med Actions . 2020 Feb 8;pnz371. doi: 10.1093/pm/pnz371. Online ahead of print. A Systematic Literature Review of Brain Neurostimulation Therapies for the Treatment of Pain , , , , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Spine and Nerve Center of the Virginias, Charleston, West Virginia. 2 Department of Neurosurgery, Neurosurgical Associates of Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 3 Department of Neurosurgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston

2020 EvidenceUpdates