Latest & greatest articles for hepatitis

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Top results for hepatitis

1. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnant Women: Screening

Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnant Women: Screening Final Recommendation Statement: Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnant Women: Screening - US Preventive Services Task Force Search USPSTF Website Text size: Assembly version: 1.0.0.308 Last Build: 5/9/2019 1:01:08 PM You are here: Final Recommendation Statement : Final Recommendation Statement Final Recommendation Statement Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnant Women: Screening Recommendations made by the USPSTF are independent (...) of the U.S. government. They should not be construed as an official position of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Recommendation Summary Recommendation Summary Population Recommendation Grade Pregnant women The USPSTF recommends screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in pregnant women at their first prenatal visit To read the recommendation statement in JAMA , select . To read the evidence summary in JAMA , select . Table

2019 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

2. Hepatitis C: interventions for case-finding and linkage to care

Hepatitis C: interventions for case-finding and linkage to care Hepatitis C: interventions for case-finding and linkage to care - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Guidance Hepatitis C: interventions for case-finding and linkage to care An evidence review of what interventions are effective in increasing case-finding and linkage to care for hepatitis C-infected patients. Published 26 July 2019 From (...) need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. Details This report summarises the evidence for interventions, to increase case-finding and linkage to care for hepatitis C-infected patients. It is intended to support commissioners and health and care providers, in making decisions on prioritisation of resources and the commissioning of services. It is part of the ongoing effort to eliminate hepatitis C virus ( Collection Explore the topic Is this page useful? Thank you for your

2019 Public Health England

3. Hepatitis E: symptoms, transmission, prevention, treatment

Hepatitis E: symptoms, transmission, prevention, treatment Hepatitis E: symptoms, transmission, prevention, treatment - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Guidance Hepatitis E: symptoms, transmission, prevention, treatment The symptoms, means of transmission, best means of prevention and treatment of hepatitis E. Published 1 June 2014 Last updated 16 July 2019 — From: Documents HTML Details (...) This document explains hepatitis E, describing the: symptoms means of transmission best means of prevention and treatment Published 1 June 2014 Last updated 16 July 2019 16 July 2019 Added provisional data for January to March 2019. 8 March 2019 Updated the number of hepatitis E cases in 2017 and 2018. 7 November 2018 Added provisional data for January to September 2018. 10 August 2018 Added provisional data for January to June 2018. 1 August 2018 Updated 2017 figures. 1 February 2018 Updated number

2019 Public Health England

4. Daratumumab (Darzalex): risk of reactivation of hepatitis B virus

Daratumumab (Darzalex): risk of reactivation of hepatitis B virus Daratumumab (Darzalex▼): risk of reactivation of hepatitis B virus - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Daratumumab (Darzalex▼): risk of reactivation of hepatitis B virus Establish hepatitis B virus status before initiating daratumumab and in patients with unknown hepatitis B virus serology who are already being treated with daratumumab (...) . Published 19 August 2019 From: Therapeutic area: , , , , Contents Advice for healthcare professionals: hepatitis B virus reactivation has been reported in patients treated with daratumumab, including several fatal cases worldwide screen all patients for hepatitis B virus before initiation of daratumumab; patients with unknown serology who are already on treatment should also be screened monitor patients with positive serology for clinical and laboratory signs of hepatitis B reactivation during treatment

2019 MHRA Drug Safety Update

5. What is the pathophysiology behind hepatic osteopenia/osteoporosis and who should be screened for it?

What is the pathophysiology behind hepatic osteopenia/osteoporosis and who should be screened for it? Chiefs’ Inquiry Corner August 5th, 2019 – Clinical Correlations Search Chiefs’ Inquiry Corner August 5th, 2019 August 5, 2019 2 min read Patients with chronic liver disease are nearly three times more likely to develop osteoporosis than matched controls. In contrast to patients with post-menopausal osteoporosis, in whom increased osteoclast activity depletes bone density, the mechanism (...) in patients with liver disease is thought to be driven by decreased osteoblast activity. Patients with liver disease see decreases in osteoblastogenesis stimulating factors such as IGF-1 and vitamin K and increases in serum bilirubin, which directly inhibits osteoblastogenesis. It is recommended to screen the following female and male patients for hepatic osteopenia: All patients with cirrhosis All patients with chronic cholestasis (bilirubin >3mg/dL for 6 months) All potential liver transplant candidates

2019 Clinical Correlations

6. Hepatitis B vaccine for renal patients: patient group direction template

Hepatitis B vaccine for renal patients: patient group direction template application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document

2019 Public Health England

7. Hepatitis E: symptoms, transmission, prevention, treatment

Hepatitis E: symptoms, transmission, prevention, treatment Hepatitis E: symptoms, transmission, treatment and prevention - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Guidance Hepatitis E: symptoms, transmission, treatment and prevention Updated 8 March 2019 Contents © Crown copyright 2019 This publication is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence v3.0 except where otherwise stated. To view (...) this licence, visit or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: . Where we have identified any third party copyright information you will need to obtain permission from the copyright holders concerned. This publication is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hepatitis-e-symptoms-transmission-prevention-treatment/hepatitis-e-symptoms-transmission-treatment-and-prevention Background Hepatitis E is an illness of the liver caused

2019 Public Health England

8. New Direct-acting Antiviral for Hepatitis C (Epclusa?

New Direct-acting Antiviral for Hepatitis C (Epclusa? MED CHECK April 2019/ Vol.5 No.13 · Page C N o 13 M ED HECK A p r i l 2 0 1 9 Accelerated Approval, Ignoring Harm, is a Crime New Direct-acting Antiviral for Hepatitis C (Epclusa ) Hemorrhage caused by an Anti-influenza Agent, Baloxavir Editorial Accelerated Approval, Ignoring Harm, is a Crime New Products New Direct-acting Antiviral for Hepatitis C (Epclusa ) Advance in hepatitis C with prior treatment failure or decompensated cirrhosis (...) for whom an anti-influenza drug should be effective. However, if you have severe flu symptoms, you may lose appetite and cannot eat. Then, you have to avoid using Xofluza due to the high risk of bleeding. After all, just like Tamiflu, Xofluza has no place in use for influenza infection. Accelerated approval, ignoring harm, is a crime.MED CHECK April 2019/ Vol.5 No.13 · Page New Direct-acting Antiviral for Hepatitis C ( Epclusa ) Advance in hepatitis C with prior treatment failure or decompensated

2019 Med Check - The Informed Prescriber

9. Hepatic late adverse effects after antineoplastic treatment for childhood cancer. (PubMed)

Hepatic late adverse effects after antineoplastic treatment for childhood cancer. Survival rates have greatly improved as a result of more effective treatments for childhood cancer. Unfortunately, the improved prognosis has been accompanied by the occurrence of late, treatment-related complications. Liver complications are common during and soon after treatment for childhood cancer. However, among long-term childhood cancer survivors, the risk of hepatic late adverse effects is largely unknown (...) . To make informed decisions about future cancer treatment and follow-up policies, it is important to know the risk of, and associated risk factors for, hepatic late adverse effects. This review is an update of a previously published Cochrane review.To evaluate all the existing evidence on the association between antineoplastic treatment (that is, chemotherapy, radiotherapy involving the liver, surgery involving the liver and BMT) for childhood cancer and hepatic late adverse effects.We searched

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2019 Cochrane

10. Intensive Models of Hepatitis C Care for People Who Inject Drugs Receiving Opioid Agonist Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial. (PubMed)

Intensive Models of Hepatitis C Care for People Who Inject Drugs Receiving Opioid Agonist Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Many people who inject drugs (PWID) are denied treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, even if they are receiving opioid agonist therapy (OAT). Research suggests that HCV in PWID may be treated effectively, but optimal models of care for promoting adherence and sustained virologic response (SVR) have not been evaluated in the direct-acting antiviral (DAA

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

11. Glucocorticosteroids for people with alcoholic hepatitis. (PubMed)

Glucocorticosteroids for people with alcoholic hepatitis. Alcoholic hepatitis is a form of alcoholic liver disease characterised by steatosis, necroinflammation, fibrosis, and complications to the liver. Typically, alcoholic hepatitis presents in people between 40 and 50 years of age. Alcoholic hepatitis can be resolved if people abstain from drinking, but the risk of death will depend on the severity of the liver damage and abstinence from alcohol. Glucocorticosteroids have been studied (...) also scanned reference lists of the studies retrieved. The last search was 18 January 2019.Randomised clinical trials assessing glucocorticosteroids versus placebo or no intervention in people with alcoholic hepatitis, irrespective of year, language of publication, or format. We considered trials with adults diagnosed with alcoholic hepatitis, which could have been established through clinical or biochemical diagnostic criteria or both. We defined alcoholic hepatitis as mild (Maddrey's score less

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2019 Cochrane

12. Radix Sophorae flavescentis versus no intervention or placebo for chronic hepatitis B. (PubMed)

Radix Sophorae flavescentis versus no intervention or placebo for chronic hepatitis B. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, a liver disease caused by hepatitis B virus, may lead to serious complications such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. People with HBV infection may have co-infections including HIV and other hepatitis viruses (hepatitis C or D), and co-infection may increase the risk of all-cause mortality. Chronic HBV infection increases morbidity and psychological stress (...) and is an economic burden on people with chronic hepatitis B and their families. Radix Sophorae flavescentis, an herbal medicine, is administered most often in combination with other drugs or herbs. It is believed that it decreases discomfort and prevents replication of the virus in people with chronic hepatitis B. However, the benefits and harms of Radix Sophorae flavescentis for patient-centred outcomes are not known, and its wide usage has never been established with rigorous review methodology.To assess

2019 Cochrane

13. Clinical outcomes in patients with chronic hepatitis C after direct-acting antiviral treatment: a prospective cohort study. (PubMed)

Clinical outcomes in patients with chronic hepatitis C after direct-acting antiviral treatment: a prospective cohort study. Although direct-acting antivirals have been used extensively to treat patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, their clinical effectiveness has not been well reported. We compared the incidence of death, hepatocellular carcinoma, and decompensated cirrhosis between patients treated with direct-acting antivirals and those untreated, in the French ANRS CO22 (...) Hepather cohort.We did a prospective study in adult patients with chronic HCV infection enrolled from 32 expert hepatology centres in France. We excluded patients with chronic hepatitis B, those with a history of decompensated cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, or liver transplantation, and patients who were treated with interferon-ribavirin with or without first-generation protease inhibitors. Co-primary study outcomes were incidence of all-cause mortality, hepatocellular carcinoma

2019 Lancet

14. AASLD-IDSA Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C Virus Infection

AASLD-IDSA Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C Virus Infection Clinical Infectious Diseases • CID 2018:67 (15 November) • 1477 2018 AASLD-IDSA Hepatitis C Guidance Hepatitis C Guidance 2018 Update: AASLD-IDSA Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C Virus Infection AASLD-IDSA HCV Guidance Panel a (See the Commentary by Jhaveri etal on pages 1493–7.) Recognizing the importance of timely guidance regarding the rapidly evolving field of hepatitis (...) C management, the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) developed a web-based process for the expeditious formulation and dissemination of evidence-based recommendations. Launched in 2014, the hepatitis C virus (HCV) guid- ance website undergoes periodic updates as necessitated by availability of new therapeutic agents and/or research data. A major update was released electronically in September 2017, prompted primarily

2019 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases

15. Harm reduction approaches predicted to reduce rates of new hepatitis C infection for people who inject drugs

Harm reduction approaches predicted to reduce rates of new hepatitis C infection for people who inject drugs Harm reduction approaches predicted to reduce rates of new hepatitis C infection for people who inject drugs Discover Portal Discover Portal Harm reduction approaches predicted to reduce rates of new hepatitis C infection for people who inject drugs Published on 5 December 2017 doi: A combination of providing clean needles and syringes and offering safer oral therapy, such as methadone (...) , reduced the predicted risk of becoming infected with hepatitis C virus by 71%. Providing both services to people who inject drugs was likely to be cost-effective and has the potential to be cost-saving in some parts of the UK, depending on the size of the local population of people who inject drugs and underlying rates of infection. Current services are estimated to save up to £54 million in costs of treating hepatitis C infection. This is in addition to the savings made from reducing the incidence

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

16. Tenofovir reduces mother-to-child hepatitis B transmission

Tenofovir reduces mother-to-child hepatitis B transmission Tenofovir reduces mother-to-child hepatitis B transmission Discover Portal Discover Portal Tenofovir reduces mother-to-child hepatitis B transmission Published on 25 July 2017 doi: Giving pregnant women with hepatitis B the drug tenofovir reduced the likelihood of passing the infection on to their baby by about 80% and did not have any adverse impact on mother or child. Hepatitis B often doesn't cause any obvious symptoms in adults (...) and typically passes in a few months without treatment, but in children it often persists for years and may cause progressive liver damage with cirrhosis and increased risk of liver cancer. Babies can get the infection from their mother during birth. The findings of this systematic review support current NICE recommendations that pregnant women with active hepatitis B infection are treated in the third trimester using the drug tenofovir and at risk babies immunised after birth. Share your views

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

17. Scaling up prevention and treatment towards the elimination of hepatitis C: a global mathematical model. (PubMed)

Scaling up prevention and treatment towards the elimination of hepatitis C: a global mathematical model. The revolution in hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment through the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has generated international interest in the global elimination of the disease as a public health threat. In 2017, this led WHO to establish elimination targets for 2030. We evaluated the impact of public health interventions on the global HCV epidemic and investigated whether WHO's

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2019 Lancet

18. Acetyl-L-carnitine for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. (PubMed)

Acetyl-L-carnitine for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a common and devastating neuropsychiatric complication of acute liver failure or chronic liver disease. Ammonia content in the blood seems to play a role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. Treatment for hepatic encephalopathy is complex. Acetyl-L-carnitine is a substance that may reduce ammonia toxicity. This review assessed the benefits and harms of acetyl-L-carnitine for patients with hepatic (...) encephalopathy.To assess the benefits and harms of acetyl-L-carnitine for patients with hepatic encephalopathy.We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE Ovid, Embase Ovid, LILACS, and Science Citation Index Expanded for randomised clinical trials. We sought additional randomised clinical trials from the World Health Organization Clinical Trials Search Portal and ClinicalTrials.gov. We performed all electronic searches until 10 September 2018. We looked through

2019 Cochrane

19. Chloroquine Is Effective for Maintenance of Remission in Autoimmune Hepatitis: Controlled, Double-Blind, Randomized Trial. (PubMed)

Chloroquine Is Effective for Maintenance of Remission in Autoimmune Hepatitis: Controlled, Double-Blind, Randomized Trial. Between 50% and 86% of patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) relapse after immunosuppression withdrawal; long-term immunosuppression is associated with increased risk of neoplasias and infections. Chloroquine diphosphate (CQ) is an immunomodulatory drug that reduces the risk of flares in rheumatologic diseases. Our aims were to investigate the efficacy and safety of CQ

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2019 Hepatology communications

20. Direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C: risk of hypoglycaemia in patients with diabetes

Direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C: risk of hypoglycaemia in patients with diabetes Direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C: risk of hypoglycaemia in patients with diabetes - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Search Direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C: risk of hypoglycaemia in patients with diabetes Monitor glucose levels closely in patients with diabetes during direct-acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C, particularly within the first (...) 3 months of treatment, and modify diabetes medication or doses when necessary. Patients with diabetes may experience symptomatic hypoglycaemia if diabetic treatment is continued at the same dose due to potential for an enhanced hypoglycaemic effect. Published 18 December 2018 From: Therapeutic area: , , Contents Advice for healthcare professionals: rapid reduction in hepatitis C viral load during direct-acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C may lead to improvements in glucose metabolism

2019 MHRA Drug Safety Update