Latest & greatest articles for epilepsy

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Top results for epilepsy

1. Perampanel (Fycompa) - for the adjunctive treatment of primary generalised tonic-clonic seizures in adult and adolescent patients from 12 years of age with idiopathic generalised epilepsy.

Perampanel (Fycompa) - for the adjunctive treatment of primary generalised tonic-clonic seizures in adult and adolescent patients from 12 years of age with idiopathic generalised epilepsy. Published 12 August 2019 www.scottishmedicines.org.uk Statement of advice SMC2218 perampanel 0.5mg/mL oral suspension (Fycompa®) Eisai Ltd 5 July 2019 Advice context: No part of this advice may be used without the whole of the advice being quoted in full. This advice represents the view of the Scottish (...) with the patient and/or guardian or carer. Chairman Scottish Medicines Consortium ADVICE: in the absence of a submission from the holder of the marketing authorisation perampanel (Fycompa®) is not recommended for use within NHSScotland. Indication under review: for the adjunctive treatment of primary generalised tonic-clonic seizures in adult and adolescent patients from 12 years of age with idiopathic generalised epilepsy. The holder of the marketing authorisation has not made a submission to SMC regarding

2019 Scottish Medicines Consortium

2. Perampanel (Fycompa) - for the adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures with or without secondarily generalised seizures in adult and adolescent patients from 12 years of age with epilepsy.

Perampanel (Fycompa) - for the adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures with or without secondarily generalised seizures in adult and adolescent patients from 12 years of age with epilepsy. Published 12 August 2019 1 Product update SMC2172 perampanel 0.5mg/mL oral suspension (Fycompa®) Eisai Ltd 5 July 2019 The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has completed its assessment of the above product and advises NHS Boards and Area Drug and Therapeutic Committees (ADTCs) on its use (...) in NHSScotland. The advice is summarised as follows: ADVICE: following an abbreviated submission perampanel (Fycompa®) is accepted for restricted use within NHSScotland. Indication under review: for the adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures with or without secondarily generalised seizures in adult and adolescent patients from 12 years of age with epilepsy. SMC restriction: use as a second-line adjunctive treatment in patients with refractory partial onset epilepsy who are unable to swallow

2019 Scottish Medicines Consortium

3. Self-management of Epilepsy: A Systematic Review. (PubMed)

Self-management of Epilepsy: A Systematic Review. Although self-management is recommended for persons with epilepsy, its optimal strategies and effects are uncertain.To evaluate the components and efficacy of self-management interventions in the treatment of epilepsy in community-dwelling persons.English-language searches of MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO, and CINAHL in April 2018; the MEDLINE search was updated in March 2019.Randomized and nonrandomized (...) , and hospitalizations.High ROB in most studies, incomplete intervention descriptions, and studies limited to English-language publications.There is limited evidence that self-management strategies modestly improve some patient outcomes that are important to persons with epilepsy. Overall, self-management research in epilepsy is limited by the range of interventions tested, the small number of studies using self-monitoring technology, and uncertainty about components and strategies associated with benefit.U.S. Department

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

4. Eslicarbazepine acetate (Zebinix) - epilepsy

Eslicarbazepine acetate (Zebinix) - epilepsy Final Appraisal Recommendation Advice No: 1019 – June 2019 Eslicarbazepine acetate (Zebinix ® ) 200 mg and 800 mg tablets, and 50 mg/ml oral suspension Limited submission by Eisai Ltd Additional note(s): • This advice incorporates and replaces the existing AWMSG recommendation for eslicarbazepine acetate (Zebinix ® ) as an option for restricted use within NHS Wales. Eslicarbazepine acetate should be restricted to treatment of highly refractory

2019 All Wales Medicines Strategy Group

5. Brivaracetam add-on therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy. (PubMed)

Brivaracetam add-on therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy. Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. It is estimated that up to 30% of patients with epilepsy continue to have epileptic seizures despite treatment with an antiepileptic drug. These patients are classified as drug-resistant and require treatment with a combination of multiple antiepileptic drugs. Brivaracetam is a third-generation antiepileptic drug that is a high-affinity ligand for synaptic vesicle protein 2A (...) . This review investigates the use of brivaracetam as add-on therapy for epilepsy.To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of brivaracetam when used as add-on treatment for people with drug-resistant epilepsy.We searched the following databases on 9 October 2018: the Cochrane Register of Studies (CRS Web), which includes the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Medline (Ovid) 1946 to 8 October 2018; ClinicalTrials.gov; and the World

2019 Cochrane

6. Antiepileptic drugs as prophylaxis for de novo brain tumour-related epilepsy after craniotomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis of harm and benefits

Antiepileptic drugs as prophylaxis for de novo brain tumour-related epilepsy after craniotomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis of harm and benefits To investigate potential harm and benefits of antiepileptic drugs (AED) given prophylactically to prevent de novo brain tumour-related epilepsy after craniotomy.Randomised controlled trials (RCT) and retrospective studies published before 27 November 2018 were included. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (...) . This study suggests that prophylactic AED should not be administered to prevent brain tumour-related epilepsy after craniotomy.© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

2019 EvidenceUpdates

7. Cannabis derivative may reduce seizures in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies, but adverse events increase

Cannabis derivative may reduce seizures in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies, but adverse events increase Seizures may be reduced in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies by a cannabis derivative Discover Portal Discover Portal Cannabis derivative may reduce seizures in some severe drug-resistant epilepsies, but adverse events increase Published on 26 June 2018 doi: In people with some types of severe, drug-resistant epilepsy, adding cannabidiol to their treatment may reduce seizure (...) frequency and improve quality of life compared with a placebo. The likelihood of being free from seizures for more than a year was still low, about 8%. However, an additional 12% of people had serious adverse effects with cannabidiol. These findings come from a systematic review, which included six trials in 555 patients. Most were children and adolescents with rare forms of epilepsy, and findings may not apply to other forms of the condition. The included trials were poorly reported and show some bias

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

8. A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment

A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment Discover Portal Discover Portal A range of anti-epilepsy drugs are effective as first-line treatment Published on 12 September 2017 doi: Lamotrigine and levetiracetam are emerging as first-line treatments for epilepsy, which people may be more likely to keep taking than carbamazepine. Reducing the risk of adverse events and treatment withdrawal is important (...) when selecting an anti-epilepsy drug as it usually will need to be taken long-term. This study reviewed evidence on anti-epilepsy drugs in adults and children. The drugs were compared directly or indirectly with each other. The main outcome of interest was time to withdrawal from treatment, which indicates effectiveness and tolerability. The findings support NICE recommendations to use carbamazepine or lamotrigine as first-line therapies for epilepsy with partial seizures, with levetiracetam

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

9. Topiramate for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. (PubMed)

Topiramate for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Topiramate is a newer broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug (AED). Some studies have shown the benefits of topiramate in the treatment of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). However, there are no current systematic reviews to determine the efficacy and tolerability of topiramate in people with JME. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2015, and last updated in 2017.To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of topiramate (...) in the treatment of JME.For the latest update, on 10 July 2018 we searched the Cochrane Register of Studies (CRS Web), which includes the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (Ovid 1946- ), and ClinicalTrials.gov. We also searched ongoing trials registers, reference lists and relevant conference proceedings, and contacted study authors and pharmaceutical companies.We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating

2019 Cochrane

10. Epilepsy in adults. (PubMed)

Epilepsy in adults. Epilepsy is one of the most common serious brain conditions, affecting over 70 million people worldwide. Its incidence has a bimodal distribution with the highest risk in infants and older age groups. Progress in genomic technology is exposing the complex genetic architecture of the common types of epilepsy, and is driving a paradigm shift. Epilepsy is a symptom complex with multiple risk factors and a strong genetic predisposition rather than a condition with a single (...) expression and cause. These advances have resulted in the new classification of epileptic seizures and epilepsies. A detailed clinical history and a reliable eyewitness account of a seizure are the cornerstones of the diagnosis. Ancillary investigations can help to determine cause and prognosis. Advances in brain imaging are helping to identify the structural and functional causes and consequences of the epilepsies. Comorbidities are increasingly recognised as important aetiological and prognostic

2019 Lancet

11. Surgical outcomes for medically intractable epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Surgical outcomes for medically intractable epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis OBJECTIVEThe aim of this study was to describe the current state of epilepsy surgery and establish estimates of seizure outcomes following surgery for medically intractable epilepsy (MIE) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).METHODSThe MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched without publication date restriction. This search was supplemented by a manual screen (...) of key epilepsy and neurosurgical journals (January 2005 to December 2016). Studies that reported outcomes for at least 10 patients of any age undergoing surgery for MIE in LMICs over a defined follow-up period were included. A meta-analysis with a random-effects model was performed in accordance with the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement and MOOSE (Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) guidelines. Pooled estimates of seizure

2019 EvidenceUpdates

12. A Prediction Model to Determine Childhood Epilepsy After 1 or More Paroxysmal Events

A Prediction Model to Determine Childhood Epilepsy After 1 or More Paroxysmal Events The clinical profile of children who had possible seizures is heterogeneous, and accuracy of diagnostic testing is limited. We aimed to develop and validate a prediction model that determines the risk of childhood epilepsy by combining available information at first consultation.We retrospectively collected data of 451 children who visited our outpatient department for diagnostic workup related to 1 or more (...) paroxysmal event(s). At least 1 year of follow-up was available for all children who were diagnosed with epilepsy or in whom diagnosis remained inconclusive. Clinical characteristics (sex, age of first seizure, event description, medical history) and EEG report were used as predictor variables for building a multivariate logistic regression model. Performance was validated in an external cohort (n = 187).Model discrimination was excellent, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve

2019 EvidenceUpdates

13. Brivaracetam (Briviact) for use in the treatment of patients with refractory epilepsy

Brivaracetam (Briviact) for use in the treatment of patients with refractory epilepsy Brivaracetam (Briviact ® ). Reference number 3387. Page 1 of 3 AWMSG Secretariat Assessment Report – Limited submission Brivaracetam (Briviact ® ? ) 10 mg, 25 mg, 50 mg, 75 mg and 100 mg film-coated tablets; 10 mg/ml oral solution; 10 mg/ml solution for injection/infusion Company: UCB Pharma Ltd Licensed indication under consideration: As adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial onset seizures (...) with or without secondary generalisation in children from 4 to = 15 years of age with epilepsy. Brivaracetam (Briviact ® ) should be restricted to use in the treatment of patients with refractory epilepsy, who remain uncontrolled with, or are intolerant to, other adjunctive anti-epileptic medicines. ? This medicinal product is subject to additional monitoring. This will allow quick identification of new safety information. Healthcare professionals are asked to report any suspected adverse reactions. Date

2019 All Wales Medicines Strategy Group

14. The prevalence of comorbidity in epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

The prevalence of comorbidity in epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2019 PROSPERO

15. The interface between temporal lobe epilepsy and symptoms of depression: a systematic review

The interface between temporal lobe epilepsy and symptoms of depression: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external

2019 PROSPERO

16. Feasibility of quality-of-life patient-reported outcome measurement in epilepsy clinics: a systematic review

Feasibility of quality-of-life patient-reported outcome measurement in epilepsy clinics: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2019 PROSPERO

17. Interventions that influence outcomes of epilepsy in mitochondrial disease: a systematic review

Interventions that influence outcomes of epilepsy in mitochondrial disease: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external

2019 PROSPERO

18. Math and numeracy skills in epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Math and numeracy skills in epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2019 PROSPERO

19. Vitamin E as add-on therapy for epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Vitamin E as add-on therapy for epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email

2019 PROSPERO

20. Effect of the ketogenic diet on cognition and markers and neuroplasticity in refractory epilepsy: a systematic review

Effect of the ketogenic diet on cognition and markers and neuroplasticity in refractory epilepsy: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated

2019 PROSPERO